SolSun Call for Action for March 22nd

***SOLIDARITY SUNDAYS DAILY ACTIONS***
Wed, March 22th, 2017

Today I'm pretty much vacillating between a) feeling psyched that 45 is having such a terrible week (last week's Muslim Ban defeat; Comey hearing; claims of the UK involvement in wiretapping; refusal to back down on wiretapping claims; failed Merkel visit; ACHA drama + internal party dissent; Manafort; sad Kentucky rally; etc) and b) feeling like running down the street waving my arms and screaming "WHAT IS EVEN HAPPENING RIGHT NOW AAAHHHHH" because we are living in such a surreal bizarro nonsense moment.

The LATEST Russia-related newsbomb comes this morning from the AP, who reports that Paul "Limited Role, Limited TIme" Manafort (aka 45's Campaign Chair for 5 months, major campaign strategist, trusted insider, and key speaker at the RNC) "secretly worked for a Russian billionaire to assist President Vladimir Putin" by proposing "a strategy to nullify anti-Russian opposition across former Soviet republics a decade ago." This is technically legal—the problem (well, one of the problems) is that he has repeatedly denied these types of involvement (he resigned as campaign chair last August after it was reported that he was set to receive millions of dollars in secret cash payments from the pro-Russian party in Ukraine). Basically he's just ONE of SO MANY 45-related characters to deny Russia connections (Flynn, Sessions, etc!), despite mounting evidence to the contrary.

Confused? Here's a fun chart!

http://www.politico.com/…/connections-trump-putin-russia-ti…

1) This is kind of a repeat from yesterday but EVERY MoC's PHONE SHOULD BE RINGING OFF THE HOOK ABOUT THIS. Yes, there are MANY other important bills and issues, but we need to keep the pressure on this—the administration is in total damage-control mode (and Spicer's lies are getting crazier) and the national outrage needs to remain consistent and LOUD.

POSTPONE THE GORSUCH VOTE UNTIL FBI INVESTIGATION CONCLUDES

In the wake of the Comey hearings, the new revelations about Paul Manafort's Putin ties, and the well-documented trail of lies and denials that we've seen from high-level Trump associates over the past few months, we should NOT be proceeding as if this is anything close to normal. As Charles Blow wrote in the NYT: PAUSE THIS PRESIDENCY! And with that, we need to PAUSE THE SCOTUS VOTE.

The Senate should NOT confirm the lifetime appointments of a President whose very legitimacy is being investigated by the FBI. The Republicans ran out the clock on Obama, even though a Supreme Court seat became vacant 11 months before the end of his (entirely legitimate) presidency. We have no idea whether the FBI is going to ask Donald Trump for sworn testimony, whether he is going to be indicted or whether the public findings from this investigation will force Trump's resignation or impeachment. This is a time to slow down—not rubber-stamp Trump's lifetime appointments to the bench.

Today we ask that the Senate postpone the vote on Gorsuch until the FBI's investigation is complete and the findings are made public. This may be an unprecedented move but everything about Trump's Presidency—including his ties to Putin—is unprecedented.

#ACTION: Call BOTH of your Senators!

"My name is (NAME), I live in (CITY), my zip code is (ZIP). I am calling to ask that the (Senator/Congressperson) POSTPONE the vote on Neil Gorsuch until we know the outcome of the FBI investigation on Russia-Trump collusion. The lies keep piling up—the reports on Manafort are just the latest. We should not move forward with the life-long appointment of a Supreme Court Justice from a president who may have mislead and betrayed the American public. Thank you."

2) SAVE OUR HEALTHCARE -- OR ELSE

It’s no secret that Paul Ryan’s health care bill is on life support, and yesterday, in a closed-door meeting Trump told House Republicans that they could lose their seats if they didn’t fall in line and vote to repeal Obamacare. Let’s offer the same simple message to our own reps: If you vote to take health care away from 24 million Americans, we will vote you out of office.

Below is a LONG list of where all of the House Republicans stand, per reporting from The Hill this morning. Your #ACTION is to see if YOUR Rep is on this list, and to call. (Note that many of the NO votes are ultra-Conservatives who are members of the Freedom Caucus and who oppose the bill because it's not evil enough. So if you don't want to call and thank them, I get it.) Keeping scripts short + sweet cuz at this point staffers are likely tallying just YES or NO.

http://thehill.com/…/322903-the-hills-whip-list-where-repub…

If your Rep is a Dem, you can a) Call and thank for the NO vote b) Get your friends + family whose Reps ARE GOP to call! c) Make some out-of-district calls! Again, we don't usually do that, but this affects ALL Americans.

Scripts:

[If NO vote] "I am calling to thank Rep. _______ for deciding to vote NO on the ACHA bill tomorrow."

[If Likely/Leaning No/Unclear] "I am calling to encourage Rep. _______ to please vote NO on the ACHA bill tomorrow."

[If Yes/Likely Yes] "I am calling to encourage Rep. _______ to stand up for the health and wellbeing of all Americans and please vote NO on the ACHA bill tomorrow."

HOUSE REPUBLICANS

No (23)

Rep. Justin Amash (Mich.) — “While I've been in Congress, I can't recall a more universally detested piece of legislation than this GOP health care bill, Amash tweeted on March 20.

Rep. Lou Barletta (Pa.) — "Unfortunately, after evaluating the text of the American Health Care Act (AHCA), I cannot support the bill in its current form," Barletta said Tuesday night.

Rep. Rod Blum (Iowa) — "I'm a no as the bill stands today," Blum told The Hill on March 21. "We need real competition driving prices down. We don’t need the government telling us what should be in an insurance policy. The government has a role to play. We need to help people who need the help."

Rep. Dave Brat (Va.) — Brat voted against the bill in the House Budget Committee.

Rep. Mo Brooks (Ala.) — "I'll vote NO," Brooks tweeted Tuesday, March 21.

Rep. Ted Budd (N.C.) — “As currently written, I cannot support the American Health Care Act,” Budd said in a statement on March 21. Budd, a freshman, was backed by Club for Growth in the election. The conservative group opposes the GOP bill.

Rep. Warren Davidson (Ohio) — “If we called the votes today, I would be a no,” Davidson told NPR on March 16.

Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick (Pa.) — "[I]n its current form I cannot support this legislation," Fitzpatrick wrote in a statement posted to Facebook on March 18.

Rep. Tom Garrett (Va.) — Garrett told The John Fredericks Radio Show he would vote against the bill on March 7. In an interview on CNN on March 14, he stressed that: “Right now, I am a firm no.”

Rep. Louie Gohmert (Texas) — “Just one thing is not going to fix it,” Gohmert said on Fox News after the bill's release.

Rep. Andy Harris (Md.) — A spokesman for Harris told NBC News he would not vote for the bill.

Rep. Walter Jones (N.C.) — Jones has bucked GOP leaders on a number of occasions.

Rep. Jim Jordan (Ohio) — Jordan, a former chairman of the House Freedom Caucus, has said he would unveil his own clean repeal bill.

Rep. John Katko (N.Y.) — "Despite some promising reforms, I do not support the proposal before the House in its current form," Katko said in a statement on March 17. Clinton won Katko's district in November.

Rep. Steve King (Iowa) — The outspoken conservative lawmaker is a no.

Rep. Raúl Labrador (Idaho) — "We need to make sure that we repeal and replace ObamaCare. But this bill is not it," Labrador said on CNN's "The Situation Room" on March 9.

Rep. Leonard Lance (N.J.) — Lance told reporters Tuesday he was a no after a meeting at the White House.

Rep. Thomas Massie (Ky.) — Massie told the Washington Examiner on March 7 that the bill was a "stinking pile of garbage." He also voted in January against the budget resolution that began the process of repealing ObamaCare.

Rep. Mark Meadows (N.C.) — The chairman of the House Freedom Caucus said he was still opposed to the bill on Tuesday after a private meeting with Vice President Mike Pence. Meadows also shrugged off a warning from Trump earlier in the day that Republicans who oppose the bill could lose their seats in 2018.

Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (Fla.) — The GOP lawmaker tweeted on March 14 that she plans to vote no on the current bill, saying it leaves "too many" people in her south Florida district uninsured. Clinton won Ros-Lehtinen's district by nearly 20 points.

Rep. Mark Sanford (S.C.) — Sanford voted against the bill in the House Budget Committee. He is also a member of the Freedom Caucus.

Rep. Rob Wittman (Va.) — “After reviewing this legislation and receiving the Congressional Budget Office score today, it is clear that this bill is not consistent with the repeal and replace principles for which I stand,” Wittman said in a statement on March 13.

Rep. Ted Yoho (Fla.) — “I could not support the bill as it is right now,” Yoho said on “PBS Newshour” on March 14. On March 17, he introduced a bill to give insurance companies more flexibility while Congress works on a replacement plan.

Leaning/Likely No (6)

Rep. Mark Amodei (Nev.) — Amodei told the AP he would likely vote against the bill as it stands after the release of the CBO’s score. He said he wanted more hearings on the bill.

Rep. Joe Barton (Texas) — Barton voted to advance the bill on the House Energy and Commerce Committee but says he is leaning against the legislation. On March 20, he said he was a "friendly lean no."

Rep. Ken Buck (Colo.) — Buck told CNN on March 17 that he was "leaning against" the current version of the bill.

Rep. Peter King (N.Y.) — King told reporters on March 15 he's leaning "slightly against it," citing the bill's rollback of the Medicaid expansion. "The reality is I have thousands and thousands of constituents who are on it."

Rep. David Young (Iowa) — "I'm not right now supporting the bill," Young told a local radio station on March 15, "but I'm not opposing it, either. I'm looking at it. I want to make sure it is something that works in the end for all Americans, and that it would pass if it gets over to the Senate.

Rep. Don Young (Alaska) — Young won't vote for the bill unless he can get more changes, according to the Alaska Dispatch.


Unclear or Uncertain (14)

Rep. Barbara Comstock (Va.) — “The legislation is a work in progress,” a Comstock spokesman told The Washington Post in a statement on March 14.

Rep. Paul Cook (Calif.) — Cook told constituents he had a "lot of questions" about the bill and was undecided in a Facebook video on March 17.

Rep. Dan Donovan (N.Y.) — Donovan on Tuesday expressed concern about the CBO numbers, but told reporters he was undecided.

Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart (Fla.) — Diaz-Balart voted to advance the bill in the House Budget Committee, but in a statement said: "My committee vote does not mean I will support final passage of this legislation as it presently reads. I have clearly stated that I have some serious concerns with the bill in its current form."

Rep. Charlie Dent (Pa.) — “I remain concerned, however, about the impact of the Medicaid changes on vulnerable populations, as well as the overall effect of the bill on access to affordable care,” Dent said in a statement on March 7. The centrist voted in January against the budget resolution that began the process of repealing ObamaCare.

Rep. Scott DesJarlais (Tenn.) — A DesJarlais spokesman told The Commercial Appeal in a story published March 7 that the lawmaker is waiting to make a “full evaluation” after the CBO releases its numbers.

Rep. Neal Dunn (Fla.) — Neal told a town hall on March 19 that he was undecided, according to WJHG, a local NBC station.

Rep. Trent Franks (Ariz.) — Franks on March 21 said he was "undeclared."

Rep. Paul Gosar (Ariz.) — “Congressman Gosar hasn’t taken a final position yet on AHCA,” Gosar’s Commnications Director Steven Smith wrote in an email to The Hill on Tuesday, March 21. “He believes that the bill is still changing and will wait to see the final version before deciding how he will vote.”

Rep. Mike Johnson (La.) — Johnson has yet to make a decision, his communications director, Ainsley Holyfield, told The Hill on March 21. “He’s still watching it through Rules Committee and then he’ll make a decision after that."

Rep. Frank LoBiondo (N.J.) — In a Facebook post on March 11, LoBiondo said he was reviewing the legislation “thoroughly, am having meetings with my colleagues to see if we have any opportunities to improve the bill, and await additional analysis next week.”

Rep. Bruce Poliquin (Maine) — Poliquin told the Maine Sun Journal he “might have drafted this new plan a bit differently,” but said he was “encouraged” by many of its elements.

Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (Calif.) — “He's not a member of the relevant committees, but is waiting to see the final product of negotiations, determined as he is to see ObamaCare gone," Rohrabacher spokesman Ken Grubbs wrote in an email to The Hill.

Rep. Daniel Webster (Fla.) — “While I am strongly committed to repealing the failed Affordable Care Act and adopting real healthcare reform, I have concerns with both proposals,” Webster said in a newsletter to constituents about the GOP leadership plan and one from Sen. Rand Paul for a clean repeal.


Leaning/Likely Yes (5)

Rep. Steve Chabot (Ohio) — Chabot told The Hill on March 21 he was “inclined to vote yes” but not there yet.

Rep. Mike Coffman (Colo.) — Coffman, a top Democratic target in 2018, is “leaning yes.”

Rep. Darrell Issa (Calif.) — Issa said he is a likely yes after meeting with Trump, according to ABC News. Clinton won Issa's district in the presidential election last fall, and he is a Democratic target in 2018.

Rep. Brian Mast (Fla.) — Mast told CNN on Monday that he is a "lean yes" on the bill. "It's definitely moving in the right direction,” he said.

Rep. Roger Williams (Texas)- Williams told Roll Call he is leaning yes after Trump’s March 21 visit to the Capitol. “I’m positive about it and I think my district is going to like what they hear,” he said.


Yes (76)

Rep. Robert Aderholt (Ala.) — "I changed my vote to yes," Aderholt said after meeting with Trump and getting assurances the bill would be changed.

Rep. Jodey Arrington (Texas) — Voted to advance the bill in the House Budget Committee.

Rep. Jim Banks (Ind.) — "I committed to President Trump that I would support this plan if it contains the changes we agreed to today," Banks, a member of the Republican Study Committee, said in a statement on March 17.

Rep. Andy Barr (Ky.) — Barr, a Republican Study Committee member, said he was backing the bill after a meeting with Trump.

Rep. Jack Bergman (Mich.) — Voted to advance the bill in the House Budget Committee.

Rep. Gus Bilirakis (Fla.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Rep. Mike Bishop (Mich.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Diane Black (Tenn.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Susan Brooks (Ind.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Rep. Vern Buchanan (Fla.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Larry Bucshon (Ind.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Rep. Michael Burgess (Texas) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Rep. Marsha Blackburn (Tenn.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Rep. Buddy Carter (Ga.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Rep. Tom Cole (Okla.) — Voted to advance the bill in the House Budget Committee.

Rep. Chris Collins (N.Y.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Rep. James Comer (Ky.) — "Rep. Comer plans to vote for the bill," his communications director, Michael Gossum, told The Hill.

Rep. Ryan Costello (Pa.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Rep. Kevin Cramer (N.D.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Rep. Carlos Curbelo (Fla.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Blake Farenthold (Texas) — Farenthold told The Dallas Morning News he went from undecided to yes after an Oval Office meeting March 17.

Rep. John Faso (N.Y.) — Voted to advance the bill in the House Budget Committee

Rep. Drew Ferguson (Ga.) — Voted to advance the bill in the House Budget Committee.

Rep. Bill Flores (Texas) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Rep. Matt Gaetz (Fla.) — Voted to advance the bill in the House Budget Committee.

Rep. Morgan Griffith (Va.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Rep. Glenn Grothman (Wis.) — Voted to advance the bill in the House Budget Committee.

Rep. Brett Guthrie (Ky.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Rep. Gregg Harper (Miss.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Rep. Jeb Hensarling (Texas) — "It could be more market-oriented, but at the end of the day, at some point you’re given a binary choice: either ObamaCare or some other bill,” Hensarling, a member of the Republican Study Committee, told local station KERA on March 10. “As long as the other bill improves it, I’m going to vote for it."

Rep. George Holding (N.C.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Richard Hudson (N.C.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Rep. Lynn Jenkins (Kan.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Bill Johnson (Ohio) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Rep. Sam Johnson (Texas) — "I’m pleased that — with a Republican in the White House — we are finally able to move forward with a real plan to repeal and replace Obama’s disastrous law," Johnson said in a statement.

Rep. Mike Kelly (Pa.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Adam Kinzinger (Ill.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Rep. Bob Latta (Ohio) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Rep. Jason Lewis (Minn.) — Lewis, who voted to advance the bill in the House Budget Committee, in an op-ed on March 17 said the legislation is “the first step” toward keeping the promise of repealing and replacing ObamaCare.

Rep. Billy Long (Mo.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Rep. Barry Loudermilk (Ga.) ­— A member of the Republican Study Committee, Loudermilk told The Atlanta Journal-Constitution he was a yes after meeting with Trump.

Rep. Tom MacArthur (N.J.) — MacArthur said he will back the bill after changes from House GOP leaders. "I'm glad that these changes reflect in large part what needs to be done," he said.

Rep. Kenny Marchant (Texas) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Tom McClintock (Calif.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Budget Committee.

Rep. David McKinley (W.Va.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Rep. Martha McSally (Ariz.) — McSally is backing the bill after changes. “I’m thankful leadership heard our concerns,” she said.

Rep. Patrick Meehan (Pa.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Markwayne Mullin (Okla.) — The Republican Study Committee member told the Hill on March 15 that he is a firm yes. He also voted to advance the legislation in the Energy and Commerce Committee.

Rep. Tim Murphy (Pa.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Rep. Kristi Noem (S.D.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Devin Nunes (Calif.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Pete Olson (Texas) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Rep. Gary Palmer (Ala.) — The Republican Study Committee and Freedom Caucus member voted no on the House Budget Committee but backed the bill with changes after a meeting with Trump.

Rep. Erik Paulsen (Minn.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. John Ratcliffe (Texas) — Ratcliffe said after a meeting with Trump on March 17 that he was satisfied the Republican plan moved "as far to the right as I think it can go" while retaining enough GOP support to pass, according to the Dallas News.

Rep. Tom Reed (N.Y.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Dave Reichert (Wash.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Jim Renacci (Ohio) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Tom Rice (S.C.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Todd Rokita (Ind.) — Voted to advance the bill in the House Budget Committee.

Rep. Peter Roskam (Ill.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. David Schweikert (Ariz.) — The House Freedom Caucus member says he is a yes. He also voted to advance the bill on the House Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. John Shimkus (Ill.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Rep. Adrian Smith (Neb.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Jason Smith (Mo.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Lloyd Smucker (Pa.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Budget Committee.

Rep. Claudia Tenney (N.Y.) — Tenney was leaning no, but said an amendment from Rep. Chris Collins (N.Y.) on Medicaid would win her support.

Rep. Pat Tiberi (Ohio) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Fred Upton (Mich.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Rep. Tim Walberg (Mich.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Rep. Mark Walker (N.C.) — The chairman of the conservative Republican Study Conference said he is a "positive yes." Walker endorsed the legislation after a meeting with Trump, where they discussed changes to the bill.

Rep. Jackie Walorski (Ind.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Ways and Means Committee.

Rep. Mimi Walters (Calif.) — Voted to advance the bill on the House Energy and Commerce Committee.

Rep. Bruce Westerman (Ark.) — Voted to advance the bill in the House Budget Committee.

Rep. Steve Womack (Ark.) — Voted to advance the bill in the House Budget Committee.

Rep. Rob Woodall (Ga.) — Voted to advance the bill in the House Budget Committee.